Today I had the pleasure of spending some time with our London based artist, Dragica Carlin in her Greenwich studio. A typical grey start to January in London, Dragica’s studio windows stood as a frame, capturing the musing and meanderings of her explorative practice within. Dragica, whilst in the transition of moving studio spaces to a nearby location in Shoreditch, welcomed me into her space with hot coffee and pastries as we sat and caught up over her recent work. 

What is so striking about Dragica’s practice is its longevity and steady progression over years of development and refining. Her practice today is sleek, elegant and completely visceral. Seeing her works, during varied stages of progression and development really emphasised the movement that stands within her final works. We sat chatting about the emerging London art scene, her vibrant career and a variety of theoretical texts which we have both been reading lately over the course of an hour. 

Dragica not only one of Otomys artists, but now also my friend, offered me some advice, as someone only newly breaching the expansive London Art Scene. She spoke about the effect of the critique, and how without support, an artist can become too critical and harsh on their practice and self. She said that when you begin to think your practice, your choices, anything and your judgement begins to be too harsh, it is best to just walk away, and give the situation air and time. Upon return, your perspective will be anew and clearer, being able to find the precision within the simplicity of things. I think this approach to decision making is very important, and is something we all should all consider when going about each day. Because it is usually unlikely that a good choice will be made in haste. 

Today, the completed works within her studio space sat crystallised in moments of transitory flux and toed the line between loosing control and maintaining their careful composure. The works create a delicate flow of energy from within the canvas, something which Dragica has very clearly mastered throughout her long standing career as a painter. 

Written by London Otomys Art Consultant Bethany Woolfall.