Otomys Contemporary artist, Ian Rayer Smith, explores the interplay of light through gestural and expressive strokes; figurative forms are abstracted with emotion and presence. For Ian Rayer Smith, the ritual of painting presents itself as a form of meditative self – expression. Such a deep connection with his practice contributes to the great sense of energy that is felt before his work.

We were fortunate enough to recently visit Ian Rayer Smith in his Manchester studio. Located in the industrial, canal area of Manchester, the studio space exudes colour and life. Paintings, sculptures, inks on paper and sketches share a layered conversation with one another. Step inside this dynamic studio space via the below gallery!

Anna van der Ploeg is a contemporary artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. Her interdisciplinary practice is comprised of printmaking, painting and sculpture. The success of two solo shows in Cape Town and artist in residence programs in France, India and Japan have been formative to her process based practice and furthered her appreciation for different methods in print. Van der Ploeg is interested in exploring proximity to discomfort and what we choose to reveal of ourselves. Using diverse materials – paper, wood, ink, metal, rust, wax – she approaches these questions from multiple angles. Van der Ploeg’s parallel role as a beekeeper permeates her visual language; the rich, ritualistic performance allows her to embody this veiled figure and mine it’s metaphors.

 

Request a Pre Sale Catalogue.

Schedule a time to view Anna van der Ploeg’s collection within the Melbourne gallery.

 

Artist - Anna Van Der Ploeg - Put Your Hands Together For The Busiest Person IN The World - Otomys Art Online

You have spent significant time between France, India and Japan – How have each of these countries informed your practice? 

The residency in Japan was also a training in Mokuhanga watercolour woodblock printmaking. This appealed to me for combining two things I love: print and wood. Since then I have included the blocks themselves into my practice. Woodblocks are a willful, anachronistic affectation in a world that has largely dispensed with ancient forms of print; the ubiquity of digital printers has made them obsolete. The use of colour and appreciation for subtlety in Japan had some influence on me. And then just being in a place of such paradox and confusing contradictions was incredibly stimulating. In India I worked in very simple media – ink on paper – and in a very hermetic setting. I think it opened a more personal dialogue in my work than I’d made myself available to previously. My days were glaringly punctuated by meals, and it lead to thinking about mealtime more generally, and how it is spent and shared. France fine tuned my lithography skills, affirming that this inaccessible medium is as unique as I suspected.

Artist - Anna Van Der Ploeg - Opposites Attack - Otomys Art Online

Having traveled extensively, you continue to return to Cape Town. What makes this city the place that you call home?

What indeed? This goddamn relentless wind blew me away with the NikNaks packets and then sucked me and my little green passport back. A friend moved to Joburg and said ‘you know, everyone in Cape Town goes on about the mountain and the sea, but, you know, I never used them!’ However, I’m here on the mountain and I miss it when I’m gone. Returning made me realise that I am, for better and worse, a Cape Town girl, a cliché I am content with. How this estranged city identifies with the rest of the country is something more complicated. The political climate, emerging voices and thoughts contain some sort of urgency. It is a space that I can’t idealise or always understand, and so it draws me in.

Artist - Anna Van Der Ploeg - How Is It To Get What You Wanted For So Long - Otomys Art Online

The titles of your paintings really speak to us. In an era where ‘Untitled’ is commonly used to reference an artwork, how do you determine the titles of your work? And how important do you find the relationship between the title and the work itself?

Reading and writing is a central part of my process. I start with writing down thoughts, links, worded illustrations, or notes from something I’m reading.  I can’t help a little cheesy wordplay, taking an opening to associate one thing to another with combining their words. It seems like a lost opportunity not to. I like the notion of the role of art to address the unspeakable, but that that work still has a title. To different extents, titles are footnotes, guides, or steal the show completely. Titles are important. In one account in Svetlana Alexievich’s Chernobyl prayer, someone says: ‘we think language, but language also thinks us’. I admire people who manage to tailor language to their own needs, to use it in a way that is entirely their own.

Artist - Anna Van Der Ploeg - Do I Look Ok? - Otomys Art Online

You have a parallel role as a beekeeper. Can you share some insight into your time shared with this extraordinary species? 

Beekeeping is such a rich practice. I took it up after two things happened synchronously. Firstly, I was walking in a hiking group and we were attacked by a swarm of bees. One man was stung more than 30 times. Everyone was stung, except me!

Then I read J.M. Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals (1999), in which an observer figure, removed from being human or animal, is alluded to. This text explores the sympathies between all species.

After that it seemed obvious that I need to keep bees! The hierarchies in the beehive and a hive’s ties to the keeper are a synecdoche for our own social structures, allowing me to probe the experience of our proximity to one another, the discomfort we sometimes find there, and what we then choose to reveal about ourselves. Beekeeping became quasi-performative, allowing me to step into anonymity, out of the hyper-visibility of being white and female in post-Apartheid South Africa. This distance provided space to interrogate the pre-accepted cast of the play in which I am an actor  – space in the shifting self-perception of young adulthood, and in making art that represents others.

I wanted to understand the relationship of a figure of power to a micro-organism; of myself to this world within a box, but it turned out I only cracked open the lid. The practice of beekeeping proved to be dense with symbolism located in diverse histories and mythologies. It is physical thinking, methodical and responsive engagement, away from the studio and making art. My fear, clumsiness, laziness has been felt in the way the bees react to me. For all the control, it is also totally unpredictable.

Artist - Anna Van Der Ploeg - The Distance between a You and an I - Otomys Art Online

After the success of your last solo show Growing To Another Sun at Smith Studio, Cape Town. What have you been working on and towards?

I’ve spent a lot of time working on applications for Master of Fine Arts programs abroad; going through the motions of interviews and funding applications. Much of the application process requires reflection on your previous work. It took longer than I expected, but the time made room for research, learning and really thinking about where I want to be in the next couple of years, how I want my work to grow and what I want to communicate.

Join us this coming week as we open Undercurrents by Sophia Szilagyi. This retrospective collection presents a rare opportunity to view an extensive body of work not exhibited for some time. Presented alongside major new works in Sophia’s signature style of evocative and painterly archival pigment prints, this is an exhibition not to be missed. Megan Dicks sat down with Sophia Szilagyi ahead of the opening.

It’s been six years that Otomys Contemporary has represented you and I can’t tell you how honoured we are to have you in our stable. The first time I saw your artwork so many years ago, I actually saw it upside down on a printing table and I’ll never forget that moment – I was immediately entranced! Before we go on to explore that alchemy that exists with your art tell me a bit about you. Do you love to cook, to garden, to listen or play to music? 

Thank you for having me! I am 46, my husband and I have a 13 year old and we live in the northern suburbs. I grew up in a creative family, it felt right to study the visual arts and become an artist. I call myself a printmaker, as that was my formal education and is my source of reference in terms of art making. After finishing my honours degree, I worked as an intaglio printer. Despite what some people may think, I am not a photographer and my work is not photography, although I do use snapshots in gathering source material for my images. I love to be in the garden. Any garden really. I am not so keen on vegetable gardening, I am more drawn to the forms of foliage and flowers. There is something very special and grounding about planting and nurturing your own plants and creating your own space. I enjoy cooking and eating!  Cooking is a little like being in the garden – your senses are at work – touch, sight, and smell.  It takes concentration, love and care. As with gardening, it focuses on the mind, and I enjoy that. Oh, and I should add, I am a coffee snob! I adore my coffee and take great care in making and perfecting it. Being outdoors, socialising and exercising in some way on a regular basis is important to me. Walking, swimming and tai chi are all a part of maintaining a healthy mental and physical balance. When I walk, I look and think.. And I really enjoy a good afternoon nap!

It seems to me that you create space in your life for contemplation – And one of the ways you invest in this is by steering clear of social media. So, you may not appreciate it, but from my perspective, there’s a wonderful freedom in your approach – I admire this about you. Sometimes I’m concerned that the world is going crazy. Whilst instant digital communication offers great inspiration and connection – It also saturates, represses and deceives. Whilst you could be wildly promoting yourself and all the parts to your day to build a sunny and glossy Instagram profile, you choose not to. Why? 

To put it most simply Megan, I don’t use Instagram because it takes up too much of my time and, being prone to anxiety, too much of my emotional space. For some people Instagram is perfect, it is just not a good match for my personality. I would rather spend my time doing something which I find more supportive.  

If you could invite any two people to your upcoming exhibition, who would that be? 

I would invite British artist David Hockney. This may seem an unusual choice, given the difference in our art styles, but when I saw the most recent exhibition of David Hockney’s work at the NGV, I was enthralled.  By incorporating Ipad drawings, large scale paintings and split screen video pieces, his use of scale was magnificent. Some of his pieces were so large they had to be printed in panels, and to see a whole work, you had to turn your head left, right, up and down. Hockney’s work is all encompassing, just as it is when you are in a landscape. Aside from this majestic scale, I truly admire that as a traditional painter he has completely embraced new technology and thus supporting a new art language. In my art I hope not to imitate what I see but rather to capture the emotions I feel; my mood in the space, the vastness, the cold, how open or claustrophobic it feels. The possibilities of expressing one’s emotional experiences in nature by using traditional and new technology is of interest to me.

So, if you were to choose one work from Undercurrents to gift David Hockney, which one would that be and why?

I would gift David Hockney an edition of my Evening Waves at 1200 x 4500mm. This large work has been created from reams of photographs I took of the back beach of Sorrento late one afternoon.  Evening Waves records my emotional response to this site; to the time and space and how it felt to swim in that powerful and unpredictable ocean. A single photo could not do that for me.

Evening Waves is an astounding work Sophia, we are yet to have a client who is not transported by the strength and beauty of this work!  You have one more person to invite – who would that be?

Although he is no longer with us, I would also love to invite Dutch painter, Johannes Vermeer. His subject matter, lighting and colour has always captivated me. Once again though, what interests me most is Vermeer’s use of space. Not the physical space but the psychological space. His images are intimate; when I look at them, I feel as if I am witnessing something private and personal, where the subject is unaware of my presence. There is a strength in the simplicity of the potentially mundane actions he painted – a letter being read, milk being poured or purely a conversation being had. The beautiful Girl With A Pearl Earring, where she is looking directly at you, it feels as if she has heard me sneaking behind her and has spun around to see who is there. I do not know what is going on her mind, but something has or is about to happen. Paradoxically, although the subjects are quiet and intimate, as an audience we share the knowledge of how it feels to be in your own private space. I love that something so personal can be understood on a communal human level. And that is what speaks to me so clearly in his work. One of my pieces which I am exhibiting in Undercurrents is heavily influenced by Vermeer and that is Girl At The Piano. I happened to see my daughter through the doors sitting playing the piano with our dog in the room, both were completely unaware of my presence and too involved in what they were doing to care. It was such a beautiful moment and after I took the photograph I crept off, not wanting to disturb their space. This is the work I would gift Johannes Vermeer.

With 14 large works and 15 small works to be exhibited in Undercurrents –  Is there one or two that are more meaningful to you? 

Each of my works takes me back to reflect on a particular time and how I was feeling then. In this way, like a diary, they are all important to me. However, some are louder than others. Breaking, Wave and Grounded were all worked on at a particular time that was emotionally challenging for me to express.

I worked long and hard on these three and when they were finished, I felt enormous satisfaction and relief. Calling although depicting the Australian landscape, was channeled by my love of the English moors in The Secret Garden, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights. I can’t help it, sometimes when I’m in certain landscapes, that’s where my mind goes!

Scrub is my most recent work which evolved through many stages and forms. Originally it was a foreground detail of a seascape on the Great Ocean Road. As I worked on all the images, the foreground detail instinctively became the whole subject matter. Scrub explores more closely the textural and sensory elements of the landscape, in a way which is new in my work. 

It is always such a delight talking to you Sophia, you show strength and beauty in the way you navigate life and it is palpable in your work.  We understand you are not a photographer or are you a painter – you are a digital printmaker, which in some ways is a hybrid of the two and your talent and skill in this medium has enabled you to create a profound study of the emotions of our Australian landscape and some of the people who inhabit it.

Congratulations – we wish much success with Undercurrents. 

Thank you, Megan and Hannah for helping me put together this exhibition. I look forward to sharing it with everyone. Best wishes, Sophia.

 

Opening Thursday 2nd May 2019, 6 – 8pm to Wednesday 22nd May 2019
567 – 569 Victoria Street, Abbotsford VIC 3067
RSVP gallery@otomys.com

Heath Newman / Otomys Contemporary / The Dot Project

 

Otomys Contemporary has partnered with The Dot Project to bring forward a new body of work by Australian artist, Heath Newman. Since first exhibiting with Otomys Contemporary in Melbourne in 2018, Newman has quickly developed a strong identity and practice as one of Australia’s loved, emerging artists, known for his quintessential use of painterly “automatic writing” and symbolism.

The Sun Comes at Dawn, Newman’s first international exhibition, explores the world of duality and the nature of the soul. Light and dark take roles in common archetypes from ancient myths to the circadian rhythm of life, the sun befalls night only to be awoken again in the morning, and so, the balance of life is restored. This concept is prevalent throughout the worlds ancient fables, stories and proverbs.

Abstracting these concepts, Newman looks to create a subtext to the fables, a renewed dialogue between this world, and others, peeling back the veil to the world of ideas and journeying to a realm of reverie. Combining fragments of still life, myths of the world, strokes, scrawls and colour fields, Heath describes his work as a mental map; both of his subconscious and of the greater, deeper collective consciousness. These ideas and the exploration of colour in Heath’s new series of paintings and works on paper drives an exploration of texture, tone, perception and depth; the arise of colour in the human eye and brain, the appreciation and discrimination of harmony and the confusion and intrigue of visual perception.

Otomys Contemporary thanks partnering gallery, The Dot Project, for working collaboratively on Newman’s new solo exhibition. The Sun Comes At Dawn will be available to view by appointment through The Dot Project.

 

Opening May 7th at The Dot Project, Holland Park, London.

Catalogue request nikki@otomys.com.

Otomys Contemporary announces Solo Exhibition by Australian artist Sophia Szilagyi. Undercurrents by Sophia Szilagyi is an exhibition based on the idea of looking back on the old and towards the new. Szilagyi is a contemporary artist combining printmaking with a digital medium and this exhibition will show new works with a selection of images curated from a 15 year period of the artist’s career.

The themes and undercurrents threading through Szilagyi’s extensive body of work present a vibrant and ethereal reading of nature. Crashing waves and building skies are infused with depth and mystery through Szilagyi’s willingness to depart from the literal, and venture into deeper senses of memory and the primal emotional undercurrents conjured by the forces of nature. The sheer beauty and spaciousness of the landscape, and the wild mysteries of the human condition are layered within these spectacularly beautiful and dream-like images.

This retrospective collection presents a rare opportunity to view an extensive body of work not exhibited for some time. Presented alongside major new works in Szilagyi’s signature style of evocative and painterly archival pigment prints, this is a show not to be missed.

Opening Thursday 2nd May 2019, 6 – 8pm to Wednesday 22nd May 2019
567 – 569 Victoria Street, Abbotsford VIC 3067
RSVP gallery@otomys.com

 

Otomys Contemporary announces participation at Draw Art Fair London. Draw Art Fair London will be the first fair in the United Kingdom dedicated to modern and contemporary drawing. It aims to present all facets of drawing as a fundamental practice and to create a platform where rare works by modern masters and recent works from the 21st century will stand side by side. This event is an unrivaled opportunity for visitors to discover the new, and to rediscover established artists. Draw Art Fair London will present sixty galleries, who have been invited to curate individual exhibitions of artists’ drawings, or groups of drawings, in a museum-style context. It will take place over three floors at the Saatchi Gallery. In the heart of Chelsea, Saatchi Gallery is a landmark building, formerly the Duke of York’s Headquarters; in central London near Sloane Square on King’s Road.

Georges Dorignac @drawartfairlondon

Exhibitors may juxtapose drawings with related paintings, sculptures, photos or videos, in a ratio of approximately 70% to 30%, using drawing as the core concept and placing it at the heart of a broader perspective on artistic creation and production. As a result, there will be rare and exciting opportunities for visitors to see drawings alongside related works, some possibly on view together for the first time since they left the artist’s studio.

Tadao Ando @drawartfairlondon

Otomys Contemporary will be showcasing a curated collection of new works by Zarah Cassim and Caroline Denervaud. South African artist, Zarah Cassim is concerned with the notion of perception. Creating dreamlike, dense and abstract landscapes, Cassim believes that reality exists in multiple layers. She uses her medium to affect the viewer’s encounter with spatial illusion. Cassim’s pieces will engage in dialogue with works on paper by French artist, Caroline Denervaud. Trained in contemporary dance and movement analysis, Denervaud has been exploring how movement can convey intrinsic emotions. Through her mark making and gestural stroke, her work presents a research of balance and imbalance.

Opening on Thursday 16th until Sunday 19th May, Otomys Contemporary can be found at stand G6.5. Please contact nikki@otomys.com for a full list of works available and tickets to the fair. Should you not be available to make it to Draw Art Fair, please contact studio@otomys.com to schedule a time to view the work of Caroline Denervaud and Zarah Cassim in the Melbourne or Tetbury gallery.

Caroline Denervaud, Paris Studio @ideih

Browse Caroline Denervaud’s Online Gallery

 

Zarah Cassim, Cape Town Studio @zarahcassim

Browse Zarah Cassim’s Online Gallery

 

 

Simone Boon is a Dutch born artist who resides between Amsterdam and Hong Kong. Living between the east and west has brought to her attention the different ways in which people perceive the world around them; realising that preconceptions, as well as understanding or misunderstanding are intertwined with the inner paradigms embedded in each of us by the culture of our upbringing. Perception thus has become an important consideration in Simone’s work. Another interest that Simone explores is how life evolves over time, space and place. Always in transition, weaving and layering, the fragments of life leave a trace of fascinating patterns. Simone’s latest series explores such notions from a female perspective; presenting a philosophy of becoming.

Artist - Simone Boon - Swan Lake -Otomys Art Online

Artist - Simone Boon - History In An Ice Cube -Otomys Art Online

‘Experimental photography is at the core of my work. In one photograph I capture more moments in time. It is almost like a mini recording and in this related to film. Intriguing to see forms of transition revealed by the camera that are impossible to grasp with the bare eye. My moving portraits of young women, unfrozen, aim to give a different perspective on the essence of identity. They hope to question existing preconceptions and archetypes of the female subject position, that penetrate our cultures and minds. At the same time they relate to romantic ideals and mystics that surround her imago. The aim was to capture the becoming instead of the being. Not the moment here and now, but the inclusion of the before and after…’  –  Simone Boon.

Browse Simone Boon’s Online Gallery.

Artist - Simone Boon - Passage I -Otomys Art Online

The weather was warm and the sun was shining bright on Saturday 30th March as we opened our Spring Show in the Tetbury gallery. UK director, Nikki Finch, curated a group exhibit that brought both colour, light and several new artists into the gallery space.

Like a shining beacon, the charming gallery window was illuminated by the work of newly appointed Otomys Contemporary UK artist, Marise Maas. The Dutch-born, Melbourne based artist plays with making what is usually seen as the unimportant, important. The precarious worlds which she creates within her oil paintings address narratives of the self through whimsical and childlike symbols. Her work “Homesick Horse” evokes a sense of nostalgia; like taking a peek back into the pages of your favourite children’s book from when you were younger. Her work welcomed our guests into the gallery over the evening and will do so for the duration of the Spring show.

As Otomys Contemporary welcomed new artists to the space; we also saw the return of artists such as Celia Gullett. Sitting confidently above an assortment of ceramic works, Celia’s two geometric oils on panel sat in conversation with one another. Although not necessary to be coupled together, the paintings pair perfectly through their similarities in form, but still manage to contrast one another through colour.

In addition, Otomys Contemporary welcomed the experimental photographic practice of recently appointed artist Simone Boon. Her work, concerned with human identity from a female perspective, presenting a philosophy of becoming. Boon’s embodies a flurry of crystallized movement and captures an ambiguity of form in motion.

The Otomys Contemporary Tetbury Spring Show will be on view for the forthcoming month as we welcome the eventual change in season and elongated twilight hours.

11 Church Street, Tetbury GL8 8JG UK

Wednesday – Saturday: Open 10 – 4 pm

Nikki Finch  nikki@otomys.com  +44 (0) 7484 751 157

Thursday 14th March, 2019.

567 – 569 Victoria St, Abbotsford VIC 3067.

Ben Sheers’ practice, particularly for the ABSTRACTIONS exhibition, is process driven and it seeks to retain the simplicity and magic of initial collage work.  By employing photography, screen printing, texture and scale he enhances the physical relationship between the viewer and the artwork and exploits the visual tension between mark making, flattened space and mixed media.

The timber sculptures in this exhibition are a natural continuation of Ben’s exploration of shape and space. They continue a dialogue of negative and positive space in three dimensions whilst making use of the inherent qualities found in the materials.

This body of abstract contemporary work is both precise and poetic. We are delighted to introduce ABSTRACTIONS to Otomys Contemporary. Browse the Online Catalogue.

‘This recent body of work was inspired by teaching my young boys how to use scissors! This teaching in turn taught me about the pleasure of mark making and the sophistication of cut and paste.’

Following an Honours in Fine Arts at Monash University, Ben Sheers’ art is now held in private collections in London, Sydney and Melbourne as well as the ING and Monash University’s collections. These works explore a visual language of shape and form through a variety of materials and processes.

Ben’s practice, particularly for the ABSTRACTIONS exhibition, is process driven and it seeks to retain the simplicity and magic of initial collage work.  By employing photography, screen printing, texture and scale he enhances the physical relationship between the viewer and the artwork and exploits the visual tension between mark making, flattened space and mixed media.

The timber sculptures in this exhibition are a natural continuation of Ben’s exploration of shape and space. They continue a dialogue of negative and positive space in three dimensions whilst making use of the inherent qualities found in the materials.

This body of abstract contemporary work is both precise and poetic.

In Australia we’re living in age of speed and sophisticated chaos and control. As an artist how do you see our creative future evolving?

I think the visual arts in general are quite remarkable in that you have always had artists whose practices embrace the age in which we are living and even help to push new ideas and technologies into areas they were not originally intended. While at the same time you have artists whose practice is grounded in the tradition. With these ideas in mind, I think our creative future will be one where boundaries are further blurred when it comes to artists utilising a multi- disciplinary approach to dealing with the practice of making art. 

And as a father of two young creative minds, what is the best piece of advice you can give your boys to navigate their way into the future?

Do what you love. You’re not always going to be able to solely do what you love but if you can keep it moving along that is something that will help you and become something you can draw upon as your move through all stages of life.  That and don’t hit your brother.

And … The best advice you’ve received?

I think it was something along the lines of “You need to make art for you and not anyone else because at the end of the day or I should say at 2 in the morning, no one else is in the studio cheering you on so you have to be excited by what you are doing”.

You have an added insight from teaching art to the younger generation – What are your thoughts on art education and what do you love about your day job?

I think the older I get the more I am just amazed by some of the things kids make and how their work has this amazing quality that we end up losing as we become adults. The irony is that it’s not until you grow up and study art that you can actually appreciate how beautiful some of their spontaneous creations are.

I think the thing I love about my day job is that I can learn and experiment with new things and not feel like they need to come back into my practice, that and as a teacher you can easily talk to 100 people in a day. Compare that to working in the studio on your own and I think the two, kind of compliment each other. 

Your art practice has shown tremendous growth in both medium and composition since winning the 2010 Metro People’s Choice Award. Your upcoming exhibition at Otomys ABSTRACTIONS is a total breakaway from your earlier oil paintings – What determined this change and what was the inspiration for this work?

The new direction in my work began several years ago but there were a number of different things that happened around the same time that led to the change. The first being, I took almost 18 months away from the studio because I began a major renovation and extension on our 1960’s weatherboard beach house. That time on the tools and away from the studio was really important in retrospect because it allowed me to reflect on my practice and kind of work think about art without the pressure of making it the same time.

The second thing during that period was a very generous friend and art collector invited my family to move into the back of their Merricks Nth weekend residence which  has an amazing art collection made up of Australian abstraction and indigenous art. So just being around these works day in and day out helped me gave me the confidence and the necessary push to explore abstraction.

Thirdly, working with building materials everyday gave me the materials and the skills to explore abstraction with. So I began constructing paintings with acrylic sheet and plywood  and combining it with materials I was already familiar with like raw linen and canvas. I started to build sculpture seriously for the first time in my career using form ply, which is used for making formwork when pouring concrete, and hardwood. So essentially everything I was learning while building was worming its way into my art practice.

You live and work in one of the world’s most beautiful serene locations – can you share with us any best-kept-secrets on the Mornington Peninsula?

I don’t know how secret they are but there are some nice secluded little beaches between Olivers Hill in Frankston and Mount Eliza that you wouldn’t even know are there. They’re generally pretty empty even during summer which means you can take your dog without any dramas too.

Pt Leo Estate and McClelland Sculpture park are also great places to visit with amazing food and wine. Both have some great works by Australian and International sculptures and because they’re outside the kids can run around and everyone’s happy!

You are invited to join us for a celebration of ABSTRACTIONS by Ben Sheers.

 

THURSDAY 14TH MARCH, 6 – 8 PM

567 – 569 VICTORIA ST, ABBOTSFORD VIC 3067

RSVP  GALLERY@OTOMYS.COM

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