Opening Saturday 16th November until Friday 20th December 2019

11 Church Street, Tetbury GL8 8JG UK

RSVP essential nikki@otomys.com

Our Winter Salon in Tetbury celebrates the work of five international artists whose distinctive style and talent is recognised globally.

Rodrigo Branco has gained a reputation throughout Brazil for the eclectic  and colourful compositions of his murals.  As a child, Branco suffered from a vision impairment which resulted in an altered perception of the world around him.  Rodrigo’s condition allowed him to see the world with more contrast, more colour, more complex borders  and mixed forms.  The strong influence of his childhood has informed his practice.

South African artist, Michael Taylor’s work can be described as ironic and self reflexive. He draws together themes and narratives that inform his everyday thinking.  Predominantly imaginary in nature, his work explores notions around masculinity, selfhood and personal mythology.  Humour and ridicule feature constantly which he uses to attract and disarm the viewer.

In contrast to the vibrant representations by Branco and Taylor, Greg Wood’s melancholic and atmospheric landscapes are without habitation and evoke a sensation of loss, longing and transcendence.  Similarly, Zarah Cassim’s abstract landscapes create ungraspable, dreamlike landscapes which question our perception of reality.

Dutch artist, Simone Boon’s abstract photography further explores how life evolves over time and is concerned with these notions from a female perspective.

We are delighted to showcase this dynamic collection of works in the UK.

You’re invited to the opening on Saturday 26th October, 10 am – 2 pm
567 – 569 Victoria Street, Abbotsford VIC 3067
RSVP and / or catalogue request – info@otomys.com

Exhibition closes on Friday 8th November, 5 pm

Trevor Mein’s cloud archive has expanded with the addition of a new series of work titled stratosphere. The stratosphere wraps around the earth’s surface above the troposphere, extending to 50 kilometres above the planet and containing the ozone layer.

This new body of work continues to capture the extremes in weather and is part of Trevor Mein’s ever-expanding Cloud Atlas. Mein’s Cloud Atlas contains a broad collection of every imaginable cloud and sky, capturing both the understated and the spectacular. The Atlas, so named in the 16th century, describes a collection of maps pertaining to the physical features of land, but in this instance the diagrammatic presents the fleeting and the ephemeral as distinct from terra firma.

In this upcoming exhibition, Mein’s palette shifts from light blue, white and a myriad of greys. Prussian blue, violet, saffron, pale pink and coal black enter the picture plane. The tonal shifts in some compositions allude to a seascape, as one becomes anchored by the suggestion of the horizon. Through the less abstracted works the viewer is transported back to the celestial sphere.

In ancient Greek Mythology the deity Atlas was made responsible for bearing the weight of the heavens on his shoulders, retribution for leading the Titans into battle. The cloudscapes in stratosphere capture both the ephemeral and delicate beauty that exists on Earth thus prompting the viewer to consider more seriously the tenuous balance and long-term future of our planet.

Words by Susan Watson Knight, 2019.

 

Pre sale catalogue released on Thursday 24th October – request to receive a copy here.

Opening Thursday 5th September from 6 pm until Friday 4th October 2019

567 – 569 Victoria Street, Abbotsford VIC 3067

RSVP essential gallery@otomys.com

SPRING SALON celebrates the rich and diverse talent of fourteen emerging and mid – career artists working across a variety of mediums, genres and scale.

This is the first Australian exhibition for six international artists – Caroline Denervaud, David Matthew King, Gilles Bourget, Karin Haas, Simone Boon and Zarah Cassim.

Otomys Contemporary is equally honoured to showcase new work by well received and regarded artists – Danielle Creenaune, Eduardo Santos, Greg Penn, Heath Newman, Jenny Lundgren, Lindsay Blamey, Morgan Shimeld and Nick Coulson. This a unique opportunity to experience great depth of artistic practice within one exhibition.

 

Caroline Denervaud – Paris, FR

Danielle Creenaune – New South Wales, AU and Barcelona, ESP

David Matthew King – Los Angeles and New York, USA

Eduardo Santos – Sydney, AU and Lucena, BR

Gilles Bourget – Paris, FR

Greg Penn – Melbourne, AU

Heath Newman – Northern New South Wales, AU

Jenny Lundgren – Örnsköldsvik, SW and Vienna, AT

Karin Haas – Los Angeles and New York, USA

Lindsay Blamey – Melbourne, AU

Morgan Shimeld – New South Wales, AU

Nick Coulson – Queensland, AU

Simone Boon – Amsterdam, NL and Hong Kong, CHN

Zarah Cassim – Cape Town, SA and Paris, FR

 

Congratulations to Danielle Creenaune for her work Quadern de Pedra 05 that was selected in this year’s Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy in London.

Run without interruption since 1769, the Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission art show and brings together art in all mediums – prints and paintings, film, photography, sculpture, architectural works and more – by leading artists, Royal Academicians and household names as well as new and emerging talent.

This year, acclaimed British painter Jock McFadyen RA takes the mantle from Grayson Perry to coordinate the 251st Summer Exhibition. Over 1,500 works are on display, most of them for the first time. Highlights include an animal-themed ‘menagerie’ in the Central Hall, with works by artists including Polly Morgan, Charles Avery, Banksy and Mat Collishaw. Artist sisters Jane and Louise Wilson RA have curated two galleries, one of which showcases work exploring light and time. Further artists exhibiting include Jeremy Deller, Marcus Harvey and Tracey Emin RA, and Honorary Academicians Anselm Kiefer, James Turrell and Wim Wenders. Outside the galleries, international artist Thomas Houseago has taken over the RA’s courtyard with a group of large-scale sculptural works, and the exhibition spills out into nearby Bond Street with a colorful installation of flags featuring work by Michael Craig-Martin RA.

Quadern de Pedra by Danielle Creenaune is a series created over the duration of 2018 – 2019. A Quadern in Catalan is a booklet and Pedra means stone. Thus translating to a booklet of stone. This series presents landscapes as pages in stone; each page exists as a poem of our human experience with nature, history and geology.

The technique is chine collé and stone lithography. Chine collé is a technique whereby the image is printed onto a thin Japanese paper and pasted to a heavier backing paper. In stone lithography, the image is drawn onto a piece of Bavarian limestone. Lithography is based on the principle that the drawn image is grease-loving and the limestone is stone is water-loving, hence they repel each other. The drawing is created directly onto the stone, processed and then when printing, the stone is kept damp. The drawn areas accept ink while the humid non-image areas repel it. The image is printed by hand and run through a manual Lithography printing press. The delicate wash effects are called ‘reticulation’ and this is created by the lithographic drawing ink called tusche. It contains grease and when mixed with water it dries producing this effect.

‘I began working on this series before leaving Barcelona, taking visual notes from my last journeys into the Catalan Pyrenees, a pivotal place and inspiration for my work over the last 18 years. In this landscape, I feel a sense of mediation and also intense energy. As with many of my works I feel there are opposing forces at play, balancing the complex and the simple, the sensitive and the bold, intimacy and grandeur, the inside world of personal sentiments and the outside world of nature’s rawness. I hope to continue the series based on Australian landscapes and in a way chart the transition back to this familiar landscape.’  – Danielle Creenaune.

Quadern de Pedra 05 by Danielle Creenaune is currently on display in Gallery VII. Gallery VII is curated by Anne Desmet RA and explores urban-focused sustainability. Key works such as Claire Douglass’s painting The Garden of Earthly Delights (which depicts a plethora of characters from across the arts, politics, TV and sport, including President Trump, Simon Cowell and Jeff Koons’s balloon dog, who frolic recklessly with no thought of their impact on the environment) are shown alongside limited-edition prints. The environmental theme is also seen in Emily Allchurch’s monstrous illuminated Babel Britain (After Verhaecht) and Ade Adesina’s climate-change-induced tornado that unexpectedly drops airborne sharks onto cities past and present.

 

 

The Summer Exhibition runs from 10 June – 12 August 2019 – Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0BD.

Browse Danielle Creenaune’s online catalogue.

Otomys Contemporary announces Solo Exhibition by Australian artist Sophia Szilagyi. Undercurrents by Sophia Szilagyi is an exhibition based on the idea of looking back on the old and towards the new. Szilagyi is a contemporary artist combining printmaking with a digital medium and this exhibition will show new works with a selection of images curated from a 15 year period of the artist’s career.

The themes and undercurrents threading through Szilagyi’s extensive body of work present a vibrant and ethereal reading of nature. Crashing waves and building skies are infused with depth and mystery through Szilagyi’s willingness to depart from the literal, and venture into deeper senses of memory and the primal emotional undercurrents conjured by the forces of nature. The sheer beauty and spaciousness of the landscape, and the wild mysteries of the human condition are layered within these spectacularly beautiful and dream-like images.

This retrospective collection presents a rare opportunity to view an extensive body of work not exhibited for some time. Presented alongside major new works in Szilagyi’s signature style of evocative and painterly archival pigment prints, this is a show not to be missed.

Opening Thursday 2nd May 2019, 6 – 8pm to Wednesday 22nd May 2019
567 – 569 Victoria Street, Abbotsford VIC 3067
RSVP gallery@otomys.com

 

Otomys Contemporary announces participation at Draw Art Fair London. Draw Art Fair London will be the first fair in the United Kingdom dedicated to modern and contemporary drawing. It aims to present all facets of drawing as a fundamental practice and to create a platform where rare works by modern masters and recent works from the 21st century will stand side by side. This event is an unrivaled opportunity for visitors to discover the new, and to rediscover established artists. Draw Art Fair London will present sixty galleries, who have been invited to curate individual exhibitions of artists’ drawings, or groups of drawings, in a museum-style context. It will take place over three floors at the Saatchi Gallery. In the heart of Chelsea, Saatchi Gallery is a landmark building, formerly the Duke of York’s Headquarters; in central London near Sloane Square on King’s Road.

Georges Dorignac @drawartfairlondon

Exhibitors may juxtapose drawings with related paintings, sculptures, photos or videos, in a ratio of approximately 70% to 30%, using drawing as the core concept and placing it at the heart of a broader perspective on artistic creation and production. As a result, there will be rare and exciting opportunities for visitors to see drawings alongside related works, some possibly on view together for the first time since they left the artist’s studio.

Tadao Ando @drawartfairlondon

Otomys Contemporary will be showcasing a curated collection of new works by Zarah Cassim and Caroline Denervaud. South African artist, Zarah Cassim is concerned with the notion of perception. Creating dreamlike, dense and abstract landscapes, Cassim believes that reality exists in multiple layers. She uses her medium to affect the viewer’s encounter with spatial illusion. Cassim’s pieces will engage in dialogue with works on paper by French artist, Caroline Denervaud. Trained in contemporary dance and movement analysis, Denervaud has been exploring how movement can convey intrinsic emotions. Through her mark making and gestural stroke, her work presents a research of balance and imbalance.

Opening on Thursday 16th until Sunday 19th May, Otomys Contemporary can be found at stand G6.5. Please contact nikki@otomys.com for a full list of works available and tickets to the fair. Should you not be available to make it to Draw Art Fair, please contact studio@otomys.com to schedule a time to view the work of Caroline Denervaud and Zarah Cassim in the Melbourne or Tetbury gallery.

Caroline Denervaud, Paris Studio @ideih

Browse Caroline Denervaud’s Online Gallery

 

Zarah Cassim, Cape Town Studio @zarahcassim

Browse Zarah Cassim’s Online Gallery

 

 

The weather was warm and the sun was shining bright on Saturday 30th March as we opened our Spring Show in the Tetbury gallery. UK director, Nikki Finch, curated a group exhibit that brought both colour, light and several new artists into the gallery space.

Like a shining beacon, the charming gallery window was illuminated by the work of newly appointed Otomys Contemporary UK artist, Marise Maas. The Dutch-born, Melbourne based artist plays with making what is usually seen as the unimportant, important. The precarious worlds which she creates within her oil paintings address narratives of the self through whimsical and childlike symbols. Her work “Homesick Horse” evokes a sense of nostalgia; like taking a peek back into the pages of your favourite children’s book from when you were younger. Her work welcomed our guests into the gallery over the evening and will do so for the duration of the Spring show.

As Otomys Contemporary welcomed new artists to the space; we also saw the return of artists such as Celia Gullett. Sitting confidently above an assortment of ceramic works, Celia’s two geometric oils on panel sat in conversation with one another. Although not necessary to be coupled together, the paintings pair perfectly through their similarities in form, but still manage to contrast one another through colour.

In addition, Otomys Contemporary welcomed the experimental photographic practice of recently appointed artist Simone Boon. Her work, concerned with human identity from a female perspective, presenting a philosophy of becoming. Boon’s embodies a flurry of crystallized movement and captures an ambiguity of form in motion.

The Otomys Contemporary Tetbury Spring Show will be on view for the forthcoming month as we welcome the eventual change in season and elongated twilight hours.

11 Church Street, Tetbury GL8 8JG UK

Wednesday – Saturday: Open 10 – 4 pm

Nikki Finch  nikki@otomys.com  +44 (0) 7484 751 157

Thursday 14th March, 2019.

567 – 569 Victoria St, Abbotsford VIC 3067.

Ben Sheers’ practice, particularly for the ABSTRACTIONS exhibition, is process driven and it seeks to retain the simplicity and magic of initial collage work.  By employing photography, screen printing, texture and scale he enhances the physical relationship between the viewer and the artwork and exploits the visual tension between mark making, flattened space and mixed media.

The timber sculptures in this exhibition are a natural continuation of Ben’s exploration of shape and space. They continue a dialogue of negative and positive space in three dimensions whilst making use of the inherent qualities found in the materials.

This body of abstract contemporary work is both precise and poetic. We are delighted to introduce ABSTRACTIONS to Otomys Contemporary. Browse the Online Catalogue.

‘This recent body of work was inspired by teaching my young boys how to use scissors! This teaching in turn taught me about the pleasure of mark making and the sophistication of cut and paste.’

Following an Honours in Fine Arts at Monash University, Ben Sheers’ art is now held in private collections in London, Sydney and Melbourne as well as the ING and Monash University’s collections. These works explore a visual language of shape and form through a variety of materials and processes.

Ben’s practice, particularly for the ABSTRACTIONS exhibition, is process driven and it seeks to retain the simplicity and magic of initial collage work.  By employing photography, screen printing, texture and scale he enhances the physical relationship between the viewer and the artwork and exploits the visual tension between mark making, flattened space and mixed media.

The timber sculptures in this exhibition are a natural continuation of Ben’s exploration of shape and space. They continue a dialogue of negative and positive space in three dimensions whilst making use of the inherent qualities found in the materials.

This body of abstract contemporary work is both precise and poetic.

In Australia we’re living in age of speed and sophisticated chaos and control. As an artist how do you see our creative future evolving?

I think the visual arts in general are quite remarkable in that you have always had artists whose practices embrace the age in which we are living and even help to push new ideas and technologies into areas they were not originally intended. While at the same time you have artists whose practice is grounded in the tradition. With these ideas in mind, I think our creative future will be one where boundaries are further blurred when it comes to artists utilising a multi- disciplinary approach to dealing with the practice of making art. 

And as a father of two young creative minds, what is the best piece of advice you can give your boys to navigate their way into the future?

Do what you love. You’re not always going to be able to solely do what you love but if you can keep it moving along that is something that will help you and become something you can draw upon as your move through all stages of life.  That and don’t hit your brother.

And … The best advice you’ve received?

I think it was something along the lines of “You need to make art for you and not anyone else because at the end of the day or I should say at 2 in the morning, no one else is in the studio cheering you on so you have to be excited by what you are doing”.

You have an added insight from teaching art to the younger generation – What are your thoughts on art education and what do you love about your day job?

I think the older I get the more I am just amazed by some of the things kids make and how their work has this amazing quality that we end up losing as we become adults. The irony is that it’s not until you grow up and study art that you can actually appreciate how beautiful some of their spontaneous creations are.

I think the thing I love about my day job is that I can learn and experiment with new things and not feel like they need to come back into my practice, that and as a teacher you can easily talk to 100 people in a day. Compare that to working in the studio on your own and I think the two, kind of compliment each other. 

Your art practice has shown tremendous growth in both medium and composition since winning the 2010 Metro People’s Choice Award. Your upcoming exhibition at Otomys ABSTRACTIONS is a total breakaway from your earlier oil paintings – What determined this change and what was the inspiration for this work?

The new direction in my work began several years ago but there were a number of different things that happened around the same time that led to the change. The first being, I took almost 18 months away from the studio because I began a major renovation and extension on our 1960’s weatherboard beach house. That time on the tools and away from the studio was really important in retrospect because it allowed me to reflect on my practice and kind of work think about art without the pressure of making it the same time.

The second thing during that period was a very generous friend and art collector invited my family to move into the back of their Merricks Nth weekend residence which  has an amazing art collection made up of Australian abstraction and indigenous art. So just being around these works day in and day out helped me gave me the confidence and the necessary push to explore abstraction.

Thirdly, working with building materials everyday gave me the materials and the skills to explore abstraction with. So I began constructing paintings with acrylic sheet and plywood  and combining it with materials I was already familiar with like raw linen and canvas. I started to build sculpture seriously for the first time in my career using form ply, which is used for making formwork when pouring concrete, and hardwood. So essentially everything I was learning while building was worming its way into my art practice.

You live and work in one of the world’s most beautiful serene locations – can you share with us any best-kept-secrets on the Mornington Peninsula?

I don’t know how secret they are but there are some nice secluded little beaches between Olivers Hill in Frankston and Mount Eliza that you wouldn’t even know are there. They’re generally pretty empty even during summer which means you can take your dog without any dramas too.

Pt Leo Estate and McClelland Sculpture park are also great places to visit with amazing food and wine. Both have some great works by Australian and International sculptures and because they’re outside the kids can run around and everyone’s happy!

You are invited to join us for a celebration of ABSTRACTIONS by Ben Sheers.

 

THURSDAY 14TH MARCH, 6 – 8 PM

567 – 569 VICTORIA ST, ABBOTSFORD VIC 3067

RSVP  GALLERY@OTOMYS.COM

PRE SALE CATALOGUE REQUEST

Words by Bethany Woolfall, Otomys Contemporary London Art Consultant.

After relocating to London in December, my usual schedule and routine has been topped on its head. This city paces on a different frequency to what I am originally used to. In no way am I saying I have mastered the Tube, the afternoons turning into night at 4pm, the differences in our typical colloquial slang or the idea of vinegar on hot chips, but I have quickly become familiar with a select corner of the art scene in this loud and nocturnal city. London boasts a colourful scene of emerging, independent and grand scale public galleries, each housing varied art forms and mediums to engage and delight the public. My role here, where every day is different to the last, gives me freedom and agency to roam and explore. Visiting galleries here is now both for business and pleasure.

This week welcomed the annual London Art Fair, residing in the ever cool area of Angel in East London. The fair itself aims to connect the best galleries from around the world with both seasoned and aspiring collectors, providing a unique opportunity to discover and champion a range of outstanding modern and contemporary art. Hosting this year 130 differing galleries each offered a diverse range of art from painting, photography, sculpture and print. Pieces by living artists Grayson Perry, David Hockney and Banksy adored the walls which were further escorted by the likes of Joan Miro, Anthony Caro, Salvador Dali and Henry Moore. What separates the fair this year apart from others, is its heavy focus on prints with new work and releases from David Shrigley, the Chapman Brothers and Lucien Freud. Whilst celebrating its big 3-0, the art fair, alongside the plethora of paintings, photography and more, hosted a colourful and extensive discussion series. The range in topics under scrutiny were diverse and set the tone for a thought-provoking and engaging event, that extended past the cubical walls of each gallery stand. Topics as such ranged from the digital archiving of artwork, gender and cultural identity within contemporary art and the relationship between feminism, its history within art and weaving were some of the hot topics, each supported by leading artists, curators and academics.

As I idled around, armed with my mornings Long Black in hand, it struck me to see such a mass of fantastic art right in-front of me. Coming from our not so little island home, Australia’s art fairs are still a short while off the big guys a run for their money. Personally, I was very enticed by the sub-fair, Photo 50, that runs along side the main attraction. This years edition, curated by Hemera Collective, was themed around the title ‘Resolution’. Strikingly so, I was impressed at the adaptation of the term ‘resolution’ by both the curatorial team, and that of the participating galleries. The Hemera Collective think of photography as a lease through which to explore the relationship between image and media, across disciples and materials. With this in mind, some of the art appeared seperate from what we conventionally know to be photography. The works pushed the boundaries of a clear image, and acted therefore as windows and vessels into a snapshot of spectatorship.

The hours spent meandering through the isles of the fair surprisingly made me miss home, if only for a brief moment. The fair was grand, and whole heartedly wonderful, but it also made me realise how vast the art world can be, and this here was only one tiny slither. As the fair comes to a close, each weekend in London from now on boasts another event around art, design and culture. For now though, it is my never ending task of trying to see how much I really can squeeze in within the 168hours I have of each week.